Caregiver Envy – My Segment on Charlotte Today

caregiver envy

Caregiver Envy – My Segment on Charlotte Today

People who care for family members and other people may be seen as selfless and unselfish, but you may not know that they may be struggling with feelings of envy. Caregiver envy os a real thing.. Oftentimes people are thrust into a that position without even volunteering for the job. Resentment may ensue because some of the liberties and freedoms they once enjoyed are now replaced by caring for someone else.  For example, seeing people holding hands and walking in the park may spark flames of jealousy. Having to meet the demands of parents who may be sicker or have disabilities more severe than their friends may arouse feelings of envy. Or maybe the caregiver had to give up a job to watch and care for love ones may cause deep seeds of envy.  The underline causes of envy are natural. These thoughts can pop up at any time. So what should you do if you have these feelings?

Accept that you may feel this way. Second, think about what your losing in a relationship where dementia is taking the person memories away. Third, focus on your grief and sorrow of loss relationships. Finally, letting go of guilty feelings and coming to terms with your situation will allow you to invite friends back into your life. There is a bright side to care giving. Be proud of the fact that you have done something worthwhile and amazing; taking care of someone who could not do for themselves. Shout out to Barry Jacobs whose AARP article was the inspiration.

Caregiver Envy – My Segment on Charlotte Today

caregiver envy

Caregiver Envy – My Segment on Charlotte Today

People who care for family members and other people may be seen as selfless and unselfish, but you may not know that they may be struggling with feelings of envy. Caregiver envy os a real thing.. Oftentimes people are thrust into a that position without even volunteering for the job. Resentment may ensue because some of the liberties and freedoms they once enjoyed are now replaced by caring for someone else.  For example, seeing people holding hands and walking in the park may spark flames of jealousy. Having to meet the demands of parents who may be sicker or have disabilities more severe than their friends may arouse feelings of envy. Or maybe the caregiver had to give up a job to watch and care for love ones may cause deep seeds of envy.  The underline causes of envy are natural. These thoughts can pop up at any time. So what should you do if you have these feelings?

Accept that you may feel this way. Second, think about what your losing in a relationship where dementia is taking the person memories away. Third, focus on your grief and sorrow of loss relationships. Finally, letting go of guilty feelings and coming to terms with your situation will allow you to invite friends back into your life. There is a bright side to care giving. Be proud of the fact that you have done something worthwhile and amazing; taking care of someone who could not do for themselves. Shout out to Barry Jacobs whose AARP article was the inspiration.

Three Interesting Ways To Grow Old Gracefully

grow old gracefullyGrow Old Gracefully 

Nobody likes the idea of growing older, yet it’s unavoidable and something we are, when you think about it, fortunate to experience. This means that rather than seeing aging as a negative, we should view it as a good thing – something to enjoy and experience in the best ways possible. Read on for some great ideas for growing old gracefully while having a lot of fun, which should make you feel a lot better about the whole idea and remind you to enjoy yourself as much as possible.

Consult The Doctor

As we grow old gracefully, our bodies begin to hurt a bit more, and our mobility changes; our joints become less flexible. Rather than ignoring these symptoms because thinking about aging isn’t pleasant, it’s essential to have them checked out by a doctor to ensure they aren’t anything more severe.

As well as this, your doctor may be able to prescribe medicine to help you feel more like yourself again. Whatever the situation, ignoring the aches and pains and any illness symptoms and choosing to live with the problems when you don’t have to won’t help you enjoy your later years much.

Get A Pet

Pets provide unconditional love and a lot of company, which may be just what you need to stop feeling old and start enjoying your old age. This is particularly helpful if you have trouble making new friends since you will always have a pet to return home to. A pet will help you grow old gracefully since you will be responsible for another life, one that is unconcerned with how you look or how old you are. You can be yourself without worrying about your age, which will make you happier and perhaps healthier.

Taking care of a pet when you are older is actually easier than doing so when you’re younger. This is because you’re more likely to be at home during the day because you’ve retired, for example, and because you have fewer other responsibilities. You can take your dog for a walk, play with your cat or guinea pig, keep your chickens clean and healthy, and easily buy pet food online at exceptionalpets.com, making things as easy and fun as possible for you. 

Eat And Drink Well

A good diet is essential for having a long and healthy life, and this becomes increasingly more vital as we age. Because our systems metabolize food differently as we age, some meals you may have enjoyed in the past will no longer be healthy for you or could even make you feel sick.

Although this is sad, there are numerous foods that you may not have eaten before that will keep you as healthy as possible while still tasting great. With this in mind, it’s a good idea to experiment with as many new food and beverage options as possible. This is both enjoyable and helpful for your health in your senior years.

Aging well will make the whole process as palatable as possible allowing you to grow old gracefully.

Alleviating Social Isolation – My Segment on Charlotte Today – 07/15/21

social isolation

Alleviating Social Isolation – My Segment on Charlotte Today – 07/15/21

The pandemic caused social isolation for so many of us over the past 17 months, but it was especially hard on our seniors. So how are they doing now that things are opening back up and how can we all help them? Aging expert Anthony Cirillo has some suggestions to help our senior population.

First, how widespread is this isolation and what impact does it have on people? At least 30% of all seniors are not vaccinated and at least 8 million older people live alone. The AARP Foundation and the United Health Foundation conducted a study, which found that two-thirds of U.S. adults report experiencing social isolation and more than half agree that the COVID-19 pandemic has caused their anxiety level to increase. Studies have found that social isolation can be worse for one’s health than obesity, and the health risks are equivalent to smoking 15 cigarettes a day. The bottom line is older people feel socially isolated. Cirillo says “that this is impacting your love one in several ways.”

The AARP Foundation has a tool Connect2Affect (connect2affect.org) that offers an assessment test to determine whether you or loved ones are at risk. It asks questions like: Do you participate in social activities or organized groups at least once a week? Do you see or talk to a family member or a friend at least once a week? Under normal circumstances, do you ever have trouble finding transportation to get where you want ?Do you avoid socializing because it’s hard for you to understand conversations? If the answer are yes to any of these questions then your love one has been directly impacted.

So what can we do to help our love ones? Here are some suggestions from Cirillo. It’s important to build and maintain friendships. Stay involved in hobbies and activities. There are ways to also connect digitally. You may want to check out something we launched called Sage Stream (www.sagestream.live) that provides live stream programs to older adults daily. It’s important to talk to family and friends to develop a plan to safely stay in regular touch. Also create a list of community and faith-based organizations that you or the people in your plan can contact in the event you lack access to information, health care services, support and resources. Pets can help combat loneliness, and some pets have been linked with owners’ longevity. Do your research. Research transportation options.

Cirillo says “don’t forget older adults are not the only isolated, lonely people out there.” We all need to evaluate our emotions and talk about our feelings. We all have a role to play in addressing this complex issue, whether by seeking help ourselves or advising others to do so. It can also be beneficial to identify daily things that lessen social isolation. Take Small and manageable steps, such as setting regular communication with family, or taking a 15-minute nature walk, can help you measure progress at a slow but steady pace. For more information visit theagingexperience.com.

Alleviating Social Isolation – My Segment on Charlotte Today – 07/15/21

social isolation

Alleviating Social Isolation – My Segment on Charlotte Today – 07/15/21

The pandemic caused social isolation for so many of us over the past 17 months, but it was especially hard on our seniors. So how are they doing now that things are opening back up and how can we all help them? Aging expert Anthony Cirillo has some suggestions to help our senior population.

First, how widespread is this isolation and what impact does it have on people? At least 30% of all seniors are not vaccinated and at least 8 million older people live alone. The AARP Foundation and the United Health Foundation conducted a study, which found that two-thirds of U.S. adults report experiencing social isolation and more than half agree that the COVID-19 pandemic has caused their anxiety level to increase. Studies have found that social isolation can be worse for one’s health than obesity, and the health risks are equivalent to smoking 15 cigarettes a day. The bottom line is older people feel socially isolated. Cirillo says “that this is impacting your love one in several ways.”

The AARP Foundation has a tool Connect2Affect (connect2affect.org) that offers an assessment test to determine whether you or loved ones are at risk. It asks questions like: Do you participate in social activities or organized groups at least once a week? Do you see or talk to a family member or a friend at least once a week? Under normal circumstances, do you ever have trouble finding transportation to get where you want ?Do you avoid socializing because it’s hard for you to understand conversations? If the answer are yes to any of these questions then your love one has been directly impacted.

So what can we do to help our love ones? Here are some suggestions from Cirillo. It’s important to build and maintain friendships. Stay involved in hobbies and activities. There are ways to also connect digitally. You may want to check out something we launched called Sage Stream (www.sagestream.live) that provides live stream programs to older adults daily. It’s important to talk to family and friends to develop a plan to safely stay in regular touch. Also create a list of community and faith-based organizations that you or the people in your plan can contact in the event you lack access to information, health care services, support and resources. Pets can help combat loneliness, and some pets have been linked with owners’ longevity. Do your research. Research transportation options.

Cirillo says “don’t forget older adults are not the only isolated, lonely people out there.” We all need to evaluate our emotions and talk about our feelings. We all have a role to play in addressing this complex issue, whether by seeking help ourselves or advising others to do so. It can also be beneficial to identify daily things that lessen social isolation. Take Small and manageable steps, such as setting regular communication with family, or taking a 15-minute nature walk, can help you measure progress at a slow but steady pace. For more information visit theagingexperience.com.

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